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Physics Lab Report: Resistance and Ohm’s Law

Physics Lab Report: Resistance and Ohm’s Law

Resistance and Ohm’s Law

Resistance Measurements

The resistance is identifying by the color code (Rcode). You can find the color code table and the figure example below.

Color Number Multiplier Tolerance
Black 0 1=100  
Brown 1 101  
Red 2 102  
Orange 3 103  
Yellow 4 104  
Green 5 105  
Blue 6 106  
Violet 7 107  
Gray 8 108  
White 9 109  
Gold   10-1 5%
Silver   10-2 10%
None     20%

2. Ohm’s Law

Equipment:                       

4          AA battery holder

4          AA battery (1.5 volts)

10        75 Ω resistors

1          DC analog ammeter

1          digital voltmeter

-Set up a DC series circuit with 75 Ω the Battery and the “wire wound” resistor provided.

-Connect an ammeter in series with the resistor and a voltmeter in parallel with the resistor.

-read the Ammeter and Voltmeter and Right down the value in First Row of Table.

 

Current I (ammeter value) Voltage V (voltmeter Value)
I = V =
I = V =
I = V =
I = V =

 

– Add Another battery in series to frist one and again try to read the numbers voltmeter and ammeter and write down the numbers in second table.

Batteries in Series

-repeat the experiment for 3 batteries and 4 batteries in series and for each situation read the value for ammeter and voltmeter and write down the value in 3th and 4th row of table .

-Plot V vs I. (V vertical and I horizontal) and find the slop of graph (Y4-Y1) / (X4-X1). this number should be close to 75Ω.

-Calculate the percentage error. (theoretical number is 75.

 

Physics Lab Report: Image Characteristic for Mirror and Lens

Physics Lab Report: Image Characteristic for Mirror and Lens

Image Characteristic for Mirror and Lens

Use the link below to find out the simulation that you need for part 1 and 2 of this experiment.

Click Here

Find out the image characteristic for each situation:

  1. Concave mirror do > 2f

do = 10            di = ………..   inverted or uprigh

ho = 2              hi = ………..   Real or Virtual

Concave mirror do < f

do = 3              di = ………..   inverted or upright

ho = 2              hi = ………..   Real or Virtual

Use the link below to find out the simulation that you need for part 3 and 4 of this experiment.

Click Here

Find out the image characteristic for each situation

  1. Convex lens do < f

do = 3              di = ………..   inverted or upright

ho = 1              hi = ………..   Real or Virtual

M = …………

Convex lens do > 2 f

do = 12            di = ………..   inverted or upright

ho = 2              hi = ………..   Real or Virtual

M = …………

Image Characteristic for Mirror and Lens

Use the link below to find out the simulation that you need for part 1 and 2 of this experiment.

Click Here

Find out the image characteristic for each situation:

  1. Concave mirror do > 2f

do = 10            di = ………..   inverted or upright

ho = 2              hi = ………..   Real or Virtual

Concave mirror do < f

do = 3              di = ………..   inverted or upright

ho = 2              hi = ………..   Real or Virtual

Use the link below to find out the simulation that you need for part 3 and 4 of this experiment.

Click Here

Find out the image characteristic for each situation:

  1. Convex lens do < f

do = 3              di = ………..   inverted or upright

 

ho = 1              hi = ………..   Real or Virtual

M = …………

Convex lens do > 2 f

do = 12            di = ………..   inverted or upright

ho = 2              hi = ………..   Real or Virtual

M = …………

 

Physics Lab Report: Simple Pendulum

Physics Lab Report: Simple Pendulum

Simple Pendulum

Discussion and review

A pendulum is a weight hanging from a fixed point so that it swings freely under the combined forces of gravity and momentum. A simple pendulum consists of a heavy pendulum bob (of mass M) suspended from a light string. It is generally assumed that the mass of the string is negligible. If the bob moves away from the vertical to some angle θ, and is released so that the pendulum swings within a vertical plane, the period of the pendulum is given as:  T = 2π

Table 1: contents of Formula

symbol Description
T Period of a pendulum to complete one cycle
L Length of string
g Acceleration due to gravity: 9.81 m/s2

 

Part 1: changing the amplitude

Before beginning, find a solid support from which to hang the pendulum. Ideally, there should be a wall close to the support so the protractor and tape measure can be attached for recording the pendulum’s movements. A bathroom or kitchen towel bar is ideal for this purpose.

A support similar to that shown in Figure 3 can be constructed and placed on a narrow shelf or tabletop. It is important not only that the support allows the pendulum to hang freely, but also that you are able to read and record measurements from the protractor and tape measure. Do not allow the pendulum string to touch anything or be obstructed from any direction. The pendulum apparatus must also be sturdy enough so that it does not bend, flex, or move in any manner as this will introduce error into the experiment. See Figure 4 for an example setup with the pendulum bob hanging from an over-the-door hanger.

 

  1. Attach a small plastic bag to the spring scale.
  2. Add washers to the plastic bag until the scale measures approximately 25 g total. The filled bag will hereafter be referred to as the bob. Record this value as “Mass of bob” in the place provided in Data Table 1.
  3. Measure a piece of string that is approximately 120 cm in length. Tie the string around the top of the bag so that the washers cannot fall out. Suspend the bob from this string so that it measures exactly 1 m (100 cm) between where it attaches to the support and the bottom of the bob.
  4. Use tape to affix the protractor behind where the string is attached to the support so you can measure the pendulum’s amplitude in degrees. The center hole in the protractor should be located directly behind the pivot point. The string should hang straight down so that the string lines up with the 90o mark on the protractor. See Figure 4 as an example of the correct placement of the protractor.
  5. Stretch the measuring tape horizontally and use tape to affix it to the wall or door so that its 50-cm mark is directly behind the bob at rest.
  6. Displace the bob out to the 5o mark and hold it there. Then observe the bob’s location during its first cycle as it swings relative to the tape measure and record the distance in centimeters as “Amplitude (bob horizontal displacement)” in Data Table 1.
  7. With a stopwatch ready to begin timing, release (do not push) the bob and begin timing how long it takes the bob to move through five complete cycles. Record this first trial time in Data Table 1 for Trial 1. Repeat the procedure for the second and third trials. Then average the three trial times to calculate the average period for one cycle, and record this value in Data Table 1.
  8. Repeat this procedure, releasing the bobs at 10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, and 30°, and recording the results for each of the angles in Data Table 1.

 

Length of string: _____ cm = _____ m          Mass of bob: _____ g = _____kg

 

Data Table 1: Trial values at varying degrees

 

Placement of Bob

Degrees

Amplitude (bob horizontal displacement) cm Trial 1 (s) 5 cycles Trial 2 (s) 5 cycles Trial 3 (s)

5 cycles

Avg. Time (s)

5 cycles

Period 1 cycle
5 o            
10 o            
15 o            
20 o            
25 o            
30 o            

 

IMPORTANT: The pendulum must swing without obstruction and should not strike the background as it swings.

Part 2: changing the mass

  1. Add more weights to the bag until the mass has doubled to approximately 50 g. Record this value as “mass of bob” in grams into the line provided next to Data Table 2.
  2. Repeat the procedure used in Part 1 using only a 10o amplitude for the starting point of the Record the data in Data Table 2.

Length of string: ________ cm = _______ m Amplitude: 10° 

Data Table 2: Trial values for bob masses

Bob weight (g) Bob weight (kg) Trial 1 (s) Trial 2 (s) Trial 3 (s) Avg Time (s) Period
g            
g            

Part 3: changing the length of string

  1. Remove the weights until the original mass used in Part 1 (approximately 25 g) is inside the bag. Record this “mass of bob” in grams into the line provided next to Data Table 3.
  2. Put the original bob containing the washers back onto the pendulum. Use a 10o amplitude and perform three trials each with successively shorter lengths of string. For example, 1 m, 0.75 m, etc. Record the time in seconds into the columns labeled “Trial #1, 2, or 3 s” in Data Table

Mass of bob: ________ g = _______ kg Amplitude: 10o

Data Table 3: Trial values for string length

Length (m) Trial 1 (s) Trial 2 (s) Trial 3 (s) Avg Time (s) Period
.25          
.50          
.75          

Part    4:         Calculations

  1. Solve the pendulum formula for g using the values derived from this experiment. Equation 3 will be used in calculating “g.” Substitute the average data for time and the length of the pendulum into the formula. Calculate to three significant figures. Then calculate your percentage error as compared to the accepted value for g, which is 9.81 m/s2. See Equation 4.

Equation 3:

Where:

  • g = acceleration due to gravity
  • t = time in seconds
  • L = length of pendulum string in meters

Note: If you get very large errors, such as 20% or more, in this lab, double-check your calculations.

Equation 4:

% error = experimental value – theoretical value × 100

theoretical value

 

Separation of an Acid; Base; and Neutral Compound by Extraction (Lab Report)

Separation of an Acid; Base; and Neutral Compound by Extraction

Required

  • Purpose,
  • Theory,
  • Procedure,
  • Data and calculations,
  • Results, and
  • Conclusion.
  • Don’t forget to watch the videos.
  • Everything is in the uploaded file.

 

 

Internship Field Placement Report Assignment

Internship Written Assignments

Purpose: To demonstrate in essay format how you achieved the Learning Outcomes and Elements of
Performance during your Internship and to reflect on your personal development.
Value: 30% of your final grade for each of DSW.252, DSW.254, DSW.256.
To receive a passing grade for the course, you must submit both a written assignment and Internship
Evaluation (Appendix B in the Placement Manual) for each course.
Submission: You must submit an individual Internship Written Assignment for EACH of the three practicum
courses (DSW.252, DSW.254, DSW.256) by the last day of your placement(s) via the Assignment Section for
Each Course. Late assignments will have 5% deducted per day. You need to submit your DSW 256 assignment
on the last day of your educational setting placement, your DSW 254 essay on the last day of your life skills
setting placement and your DSW 252 essay on the last day of your residential setting placement. If you are
doing life skills and residential in the same setting, your 252 and 254 essays are due no later than the last day
of placement.

Assignment Guidelines:
– You will submit one written assignment for each of the following courses you are completing:
DSW.252 Home/Community Practicum
DSW.254 Life Skills/Seniors Practicum
DSW.256 Education/Employment Practicum
– You are required to complete Part A and Part B (described below) for all three essays
– Use Appendix B of the Placement Manual for your Evaluations and for these written assignments
– Use the wording from the Appendix B in your written assignments. These words should become part of
your professional vocabulary, so you need to use them here and know what they mean.
– You must include a cover page that includes the following:
Name
Student number
College Supervisor’s name
Submission Date
Course number (DSW 252, 254, 256) & the Course Name (Home and Community, Life Skills/Seniors,
or Education/Employment)
Elements of Performance Chart (Copy and paste from page 4 of this document)
Part A with word count
Part B with word count

Part A – Placement Work Experience Essay (2500 – 3000 words)
For each Placement Work Experience Essay, you will review the Learning Outcomes and the Elements of
Performances in Appendix B of the Placement Manual and match them to what you did while on
placement in each setting (i.e., Home/Community, Life Skills/Seniors, Education/Employment). You can
only use each example of work you did once. You will need to have many different examples of your
work to write your essays. It would benefit you to keep notes as you are completing placement, so you
have many examples of work you did and the responses you got.
In Internship, you are covering three courses during two placements – DSW 252, 254 and 256. You need
a separate essay for each course (DSW 252, 254 and 256). Each essay will focus on the skills that match
that course (i.e., Home/Community, Life Skills/Seniors, Education/Employment).
Each one of your Internship essays must document how you demonstrated 13 Elements of Performance,
without repeating any of the elements throughout your three essays.
Learning Outcomes 1 through 6 in Appendix B have a total of 39 specific Elements of Performance.
• Learning Outcome #1 is broken down into 6 Elements of Performance
• Learning Outcome #2 is broken down into 9 Elements of Performance
• Learning Outcome #3 is broken down into 5 Elements of Performance
• Learning Outcome #4 is broken down into 6 Elements of Performance
• Learning Outcome #5 is broken down into 9 Elements of Performance
• Learning Outcome #6 is broken down into 4 Elements of Performance
For each Element of Performance provide a clear example of how you met this element of performance.
Describe:
• What you did
• Why you did it
• How it fulfils the Element of Performance you have selected
• The response you got from individuals you supported, other staff, and/or your supervisor
Refer to the Marking Rubric at the end of this document when you are writing your essay so that you
meet the requirements and get top marks.
Remember to explain what you did, why you did it, and the response you received.

Part B – Personal and Professional Reflection (800 – 1000 words)
As an appendix to each of your essays, write a separate three- to four-page reflection (800 – 1000
words) of your experience at placement and your plan for future placements and/or future professional
development.
This part of the assignment is all about you, your professionalism, and your skills.
For the Reflections, you will use Learning Outcome #7. Learning Outcome 7 is not contained in your
Placement Manual. This learning outcome is taken directly from the Developmental Services Worker
Program Standard and is summarized below. In each reflection you must write about how you
demonstrated at least five different Elements of performances of Learning Outcome #7 presented
below:
7.1 Explain how on-going professional development is essential to effective practice.
7.2 Recognize the relevance of the Developmental Services Human Resource (DS HR) Strategy Core
Competencies to employment in the Developmental Services (DS) field.
7.3 Demonstrate the DS HR Threshold Competencies in practice.
7.4 Conduct routine self-assessments of current behavioural competencies, knowledge and technical
skills to formulate professional development plans.
7.5 Develop a professional portfolio that identifies skills and abilities for employment.
7.6 Assess and respond professionally to work-related feedback.
7.7 Implement strategies to enhance self-care, job performance, and work relationships.
7.8 Identify the entrepreneurial skills and standards of practice required of a Developmental Services
Worker who is self-employed.
7.9 Use resources, evidence-based practices, and supervision to enhance professional growth.
7.10 Recognize indicators of one’s own stress, fatigue, and illness, including bereavement, compassion
fatigue, and vicarious trauma.
7.11 Identify and access resources to support self-care as needed.
You must write about each of the Elements of Performance from Learning Outcome #7 at least once
over your three Written Placement Assignment Reflections. For each of the Elements of Performance
above demonstrate that you have a good understanding of the skill/task and that you can apply this
Element of Performance to your professional development. This section is all about you – not what
others are doing or what you should do or might do but what you are actually doing to enhance your
professional development.

Grading:
Each written assignment is worth 30% of your grade. The Internship Evaluation completed by your
Agency Supervisor is worth 70% of your grade for the associated practicum.
A student’s evaluation by their onsite supervisor is the baseline grade for the whole practicum. Students
cannot receive a higher grade (by percentage) on their placement essay than they did on their
placement evaluation. This means that if you received a 60% grade on your evaluation (42/70), you
cannot receive a grade of higher than 60% on your essay as this would not accurately portray your actual
performance and accomplishment of learning outcomes on placement.

Format of Written Assignments
In each essay students must detail their experiences at the placement using the following format.
– Begin with an introduction for the essay that explains the environment you are placed in (e.g.,
age of participants, typical daily schedule, ability levels and an introduction of the “code” you
will use to distinguish between participants in your essay while maintaining confidentiality). Be
sure to use a professional language in your descriptions and coding.
– Next, start with a heading that includes the actual title of each Learning Outcome you will be
discussing (e.g., Learning Outcome 2.2). Use the language shown in the outline to introduce
what you did (e.g., “I demonstrated collaborating with people with development disabilities to
exercise self-sufficiency and self-determination by…”)
– Provide specific examples of what you did with the participant(s). Remember to describe what
you did, why you did it, and the response you received. Be sure to document the rationale for
your choices.
– End your essay with a conclusion that summarized your experience.
– Ensure that your essay is within the word count for the assignment.
Tips for Getting Started:
1) Decide which of the three essays you are writing and focus only on the skill you are
demonstrating – Life skills/Seniors? Home and community? Educational/employment?
2) You should always write an essay while you are in the related placement and attempt to finish
your essay as you finish your placement. Do not leave all 3 essays until the end!
3) Use the wording directly from the Learning Outcomes in your essay to clarify which Learning
Outcome you have accomplished (see the text box below for specific details).
4) For Part B of this assignment, relate to your own personal and professional development.
5) It is recommended that you keep a daily journal or log of your activities in placement to keep
track of examples to use in your essay. This journal or log is not to be handed in. It is for your
own personal use.
6) For confidentiality reasons, do not use the name of agency/school or the names of
participants/clients/students or other staff in your daily journal or essay. Instead you may
choose to use the person’s first initial only or “Student A”/”Staff A.”
7) Be sure you are using Appendix B. Be sure your Site Supervisor has the right Appendix to do
your evaluation.
8) If you need help with your writing skills, use the Writing Centre here at Humber for support.
Example of a partial paragraph for your essay demonstrating Element 1.1:
Learning Outcome 1 Element 1: I developed a rapport with the people at placement while providing
support to them by purposely spending one-on-one time with them at the beginning of my shift. I had
permission to read to their case files which gave me good background information. They both have
limited speech skills. I use the iPad to communicate with R. With J I ask questions and watch his facial
expression. I could tell I was developing rapport because….

 

V-belt Drive System Lab Report

Objective:

Using Mdesign software, Design a V-belt drive system by specify the belt size, the sheave sizes, and the number of belts, the actual output speed, and the center distance.

 

Introduction:

Write an introduction of 200-250 words

Introduction should provide a background of work documented in report: Fundamentals of design parameters (flexible power transmission elements), reason behind this experiment, benefits gained by conducting this experiment.

 

Procedure:

Write the step procedure you followed to achieve the results.

 

Results:

Place the results from the task assigned for each individual.

 

Conclusion:

Please write a brief review of what has been deduced from the work conducted.

No new information should be given in the conclusion that is not stated earlier in the report

 

References

Always practice keeping references (google search page links are not accepted)

 

Note:

  • Please don’t waste to time preparing the cover page, just add your group members name in the first page attached.
  • Whenever using screenshots/pics in the report, please keep the details of each posted screenshots/pics.
Report Assessment Criteria
Criteria Marks Allocation Grade
Report submission on time 10  
Introduction related to experiment objective 20  
Simulation Part: using MDESIGN software 50  
Conclusion and References 20  
 

Total marks out of 100

 

 

Assessment Weight Marks Obtained Comments
practical 30%    
Lab report 70%    
Total 100%    

 

 

 

Physics of Collision . Elastic and Inelastic Collision.

Physics of Collision . Elastic and Inelastic Collision.

1a) In hockey, bumps and checks are useful to throw an opponent off. Even small, unexpected
changes in his velocity can disrupt an opponent’s timing. In a game, an 80-kg player skating at
10 m/s overtakes and bumps from behind a 100-kg player moving in the same direction at 8 m/s.
As a result, the 100-kg player’s speed increases to 9.42 m/s.
1)How fast is the 80-kg player moving after the bump? Round the final answer to three decimal
places.

2)Calculate the coefficient of restitution associated with the collision. Round the final answer to
four decimal places.
1b)
A 0.35-kg tennis racquet moving to the right at 26 m/s hits a 0.06-kg tennis ball that is moving to
the left at 36 m/s. After the collision, the racquet continues to the right, but at the reduced speed
of 16 m/s.
1)What is the total momentum of the ball–racquet system before the collision? Round the final
answer to three decimal places.
kg m/s

2)Calculate the ball’s speed after the collision. Round the final answer to two decimal places.
m/s
3)What is the coefficient of restitution? Round the final answer to two decimal places.
4)Using a contact time of 6 ms, determine the peak force on the ball in the collision. Round the
final answer to three decimal places.
lb
1c) A punter in a game of football launches the ball at 52.1 mph at an angle of 75.9° with respect
to the horizontal. Ignore the effects of air and treat the punt using free-fall kinematic equations.

The mass of the football is 0.42 kg.
1)Calculate the ball’s kinetic energy just as it leaves the punter’s foot. Round the final answer to
two decimal places.
J
2) What is the ball’s speed at the highest point in its flight? Round the final answer to two decimal
places.
m/s
3) Calculate the ball’s kinetic energy at the highest point in its flight. Round the final answer to
three decimal places.
J
4) Determine the gravitational energy of the ball at its highest point. Round the final answer to
one decimal place.
J
5) Determine the gravitational and kinetic energy of the ball halfway up to its highest point.
Round the final answers to two decimal places.
Gravitational energy =
J
Kinetic energy =
J
6) The bullet from a typical 0.357 Magnum pistol is 8 g and listed muzzle velocities are typically
about 1400 ft/s. Compare the kinetic energy of a just-punted football to such a bullet. Calculate
the percentage of increase in the kinetic energy of the ball when compared to that of the bullet.
Round the final answer to the nearest whole number.
%
7) Due to air drag, the ball was measured to hit the ground at 38 mph. Calculate the thermal
energy that was generated by the ball’s passage through the air. Round the final answer to one
decimal place.
J

Effect of pH on Enzyme Activity – Biology Lab Report

Effect of pH on Enzyme Activity

Format of the Report

  • Purpose of the experiment
  • Hypothesis
  • Prediction
  • Procedure
  • Setup
  • Materials
  • Steps
  • Observations
  • Conclusion

Effect of Temperature on Enzyme Activity – Biology Lab Report

Effect of Temperature on Enzyme Activity

Format of the Report

  • Purpose of the experiment
  • Hypothesis
  • Prediction
  • Procedure
  • Setup
  • Materials
  • Steps
  • Observations
  • Conclusion